Biohaus: First Certified PassivHaus in the U.S.

Front View of the Waldsee BioHaus
Front View of the Waldsee BioHaus

The other day I posted about one of the [intlink id=”565″ type=”post” target=”_blank”]first passive houses built in the U.S.[/intlink] I just ran across another passive house example – this one is the first U.S.-built home to be certified to the German Passivhaus standard. The house was built at the Concordia  Language Villages in Minnesota in 2006, partially funded by the first-ever grant to a U.S. recipient by the German environmental foundation Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt (DBU).

Under the guidance of architect Stephan Tanner of INTEP, LLC, a Minneapolis- and Munich-based consulting company for high performance and sustainable construction, Waldsee BioHaus is modeled on Germany’s Passivhaus standard: a highly-efficient building design (beyond that of the U.S. LEED standard which improves quality of life inside the building while using 85% less energy than comparable U.S. structures.

The building materials and mechanicals were primarily sourced from local suppliers, although a few components were imported from Germany. These were items that either were not available (at that time) in the States, or which were provided by sponsored by the funders. Here’s another link to Waldsee Biohaus information.

It’s fascinating to me that only a handful of these houses have been built here in the States so far. Each of the houses I’ve posted about uses 80-90% less energy than a comparable conventional house. Their build out costs are comparable to conventional houses in their area, and lifecycle costs are definitely less, based on actual measurements. The approach has been proven extensively in Europe, and has been shown to be effective in every country in Europe, not to mention multiple climate zones in the U.S. It’s simple and has just three key components. The European Community is moving to make passive house the EU standard.

But despite this, here in the U.S., where buildings are responsible for 40% of our energy usage, where we have Architecture 2030, a Federal mandate for zero energy buildings, and efforts like the California Public Utilities Commission’s 2020 project, none of our codes – state building codes, LEED, Green Points, or local codes, call out the three key components of passive houses as desirable, much less required. I think this has to change.

Your thoughts? Please let me know in the comments.

2 thoughts on “Biohaus: First Certified PassivHaus in the U.S.”

  1. Nils,
    I like your questions at the end of this post – codes and incentives are so important along with education.
    The Internet is hot today with just this very information. Thank you for keeping us informed and helping to educated.

    I am going to do a shout out on tomorrow’s post for your site – Hope that is ok?

    Nice work guy! I sure do appreciate your words and efforts. Thank you

    Patricia’s last blog post..Dream Bicycle

    1. Patricia – thanks for your nice comments. I’m very interested in this issue of codes – right now I’m working with the City of Menlo Park to try to get their new Climate Action Plan to provide incentives for builders and home owners to focus on residential energy efficiency. It has to be done locally, since the state code doesn’t go far enough.

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