More amazing energy storage news

I posted yesterday about three new breakthrough discoveries related to energy storage from the last week, but they keep on coming – here’s another:

Some researchers at Melbourne’s Monash University in Australia have made yet another breakthrough related to making fuel cells more feasible for general purpose use. Their breakthrough is related to a new cathode design, made with a much cheaper material than the typical platinum. The result is an order of magnitude reduction in the materials cost for the fuel cell.

Professor Maria Forsythe and her colleagues used a conducting polymer (a special plastic that conducts electricity) called poly(3,4-ethlenedioxythiphene), or PEDOT for the cathode, instead of platinum. The amount of platinum required for a passenger car fuel cell costs $3500 to $4000, and accounts for the major part of the cost of the fuel cell. Using PEDOT for the cathode reduces the cost to a few hundred dollars.

Forsyth says the cathode could also be used in zinc air batteries, which are under development for storing energy in cars.

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